#OpenBook: June 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

cinder alliaCinder Allia by Karen Ullo. A Cinderella story like you’ve never heard it before, Cinder Allia fills in a grim backstory to the famous Grimm fairy tale. This novel answers the burning question every reader has about the fairy tale: why would Cinderella’s father allow her stepmother to treat her so badly? Ullo reveals Allia’s stepmother’s motives in keeping her in servitude and serves up a surprising twist in the form of a not-so-perfect Prince Charming. My full review is coming soon.(ARC received from author, who is a fellow member of the Catholic Writers Guild)

dying for compassionDying for Compassion (The Lady Doc Murders Book 2) by Barbara Golder. A murder mystery by an author whose mysteries include enough character development to satisfy readers like me who usually avoid that genre (and very little gore, especially considering the main character’s profession as the local coroner). Dying for Compassion puts a human face on the euthanasia debate and how it plays out in cases involving children and adults. (ARC received from publisher a fellow member of the Catholic Writers Guild)

shattered roseShattered Rose by T.L. Gray. A college student battling an eating disorder without a support system moves in with the wrong roommate and falls hard for the wrong guy, who happens to be her roommate’s cousin. If this isn’t challenging enough, the right guy comes along, and she doesn’t know how to trust him. Editing issues were distracting to this reader.

clairClair by Grace Greene. A sweet beach romance for sure, and a satisfying story. Clair’s friends get together at an exotic resort and put messages in bottles to see if they can attract romance. She does so halfheartedly because she’s already engaged. A year later, her heart is broken and she’s been conned out of her savings by that former fiance–but someone has found the message she put in the bottle and has come to seek her out. Part of the “Beach Brides” series written by multiple authors on a single theme.

sea keepers daughtersThe Sea Keeper’s Daughters by Lisa Wingate. Whitney, a restauranteur trying to save her business from a hostile takeover, returns to the defunct hotel her grandmother used to run in the Outer Banks. Her hopes of easy money from the inheritance of this hotel are complicated by her stubborn stepfather and unexpected romance. I’m a big fan of this author’s work. This is part of a series but it’s less a series than a group of connected books, so you won’t miss anything if you read it as a standalone.

rejected writers take the stageRejected Writers Take the Stage by Suzanne Kelman. This was entertaining, but less so than the first novel in the series (they do need to be read in order.) The rejected writers set out to save their friend Annie’s farm by writing and performing a stage play, resulting in a comedy of errors. Add in the narrator’s daughter, pregnant with twins and close to her due date but insisting on helping with the show, and there are predictable hijinks afoot.

feels like familyFeels like Family by Sherryl Woods. Single attorney Helen decides to go about her dream of having a family–against her friends’ advice, by deceiving the man who loves her. Helen was, for me, the least likable character in this novel. It’s part of a series; I’ll look forward to reading the others.

stars among the deadStars among the Dead by Marcy McKay. This book is a prequel to Pennies from Burger Heaven and in some ways even more difficult to handle. The subject matter–a young girl and her drug-addicted mother who turns to prostitution to support her habit and her child is harrowing. Graphic violence. (ARC received from author)

Nonfiction

costa-1Healing Promises: The Essential guide to the Sacred Heart by Anne Costa. This book is packed with opportunities for growth in prayer and devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Whether you’re already familiar with St. Margaret Mary’s revelations and their application in our lives or this topic is new to you, Costa’s book will invite you into a deeper practice of the Faith. Read my full review. (ARC received from publisher)

Overmyer-Soar-coverBorn to Soar: Unleashing God’s Word in Your Life by Melissa Overmyer. This journal is designed to be used over the course of six weeks, so it’s a perfect summer spiritual retreat. Each of the six chapters of the book corresponds to one of the stages in the life cycle of the caterpillar who ultimately becomes a beautiful butterfly. That science lesson we remember from grade school becomes a lesson for our souls in Born to SoarRead my full review. (ARC received from publisher)

that nothing may be lostThat Nothing May Be Lost: Reflections on Catholic Doctrine and Devotion by Father Paul Scalia. Father Paul Scalia’s new collection of essays has a unique structure: each chapter has an introduction written by a guest author, followed by several of Scalia’s own essays. Many of these were previously published as blog posts, monthly commentaries or bulletin columns. The detailed table of contents allows the reader to skip around as desired, choosing just the essay that invites itself to be read at that particular moment. The chapter introductions, by guest authors including Scott Hahn, Raymond Arroyo, Helen Alvaré and several others, may be read on their own as well. These essays provide not only important information, but an invitation to delve deeper into our faith through study, prayer and sacrament. I love that throughout this book, Father Scalia and his guest authors unfailingly express their own deep faith in God and affection for the Church and its traditions, welcoming the reader to ever more deeply participate in the life of faith. Read my full review. (ARC received from publisher)

witness to wonderWitness to Wonder by Regis Martin. Author and Franciscan University professor Dr. Regis Martin’s new book was written with committed Catholics in mind. Designed for the reader who wants to go deeper into the beauty and meaning of the Catholic faith, Witness to Wonder (Emmaus Road, 2017) delves into theology and poetry that energize Catholics in the appreciation and practice of the Faith. Read my full review.  (ARC received from publisher)

YOUCAT_BIBLEYOUCAT Bible. A two-page guide on reading the Bible is an eye-catching way to begin this book, designed for Catholic youth and young adults. This 10-step guide is supplemented with a quote from Catholic philosopher Peter Kreeft. Throughout this study Bible, quotes from popes, saints theologians, and famous contemporary Catholics appear in the margin notes along with explanations of vocabulary and customs and references to other related Bible verses. Read my full review.  (ARC received from publisher)

Children’s/YA

finding patienceFinding Patience (Adventures in Faith, Hope and Charity) by Virginia Lieto. The first book in the “Adventures of Faith, Hope and Charity” series is perfect for the emerging reader. This sweet story focuses on Faith, the oldest of three sisters, as the family moves to a new town. Lonely for friends, Faith doesn’t know how to go about finding friendship with kids her own age, and she quickly discovers that sitting back and waiting for friends to find her isn’t going to work. Faith’s mom empathizes with her and reassures her that all she needs is some patience. This book’s lessons on friendship and patience make it an ideal classroom read-aloud. “Finding Patience” ends with a prayer for patience, especially designed for the young reader. (ARC received from author, who is a fellow member of the Catholic Writers Guild)

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

open book new logo

#OpenBook: May 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

The Memory of Butterflies by Grace Greene. Secrets have a way of coming out–and the longer you keep them, the deeper the repercussions. As Hannah prepares to send her daughter Ellen off to college, she begins rebuilding her childhood home, opening the door to the revelation of long-buried secrets that threaten the foundation of her family life. Hannah must decide whether to sacrifice herself to protect those she loves. Grace Greene has created a world that the reader will picture vividly. Some scenes will make you weep, and there are some good surprises in the story as well! (Netgalley review.)

Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate. This heartbreaking novel, based on a true story, follows several children from a Depression-era family who are snatched from their home and their parents under the guise of a corrupt social program that’s a cover for illegal adoptions. Parallel story lines detail the children’s experience in the Tennessee Children’s Home and the efforts of their modern-day grandchildren to uncover the mysteries surrounding their grandparents’ early lives in order to offer peace to their grandparents in their last days. (Netgalley review.)

Then Came You by Becky Wade. Carolyn got me interested in reading this author’s work after talking it up in last month’s Open Book. Then Came You is a novella that sets the stage for the Bradford Sisters Romance series: it’s the story of the three sisters’ early life with their father, Garner Bradford, heir to a huge shipping empire. The story is told through letters, phone conversations and journal entries.

True to You by Becky Wade. Nora Bradford, the middle daughter in the family, is a genealogist and owner/curator of a local historical village. Nora is still getting over a breakup several years ago, but she finds herself falling for the former Navy SEAL who’s hired her to locate his birth mother so he can find out more about his medical history.

Unquestionably Yours by Becky Wade. Oilman’s daughter Meg inherits her father’s business empire but doesn’t want any part of running it. When she decides to shut down his ranching enterprise, manager Bo Porter sets out to convince her to keep it open. He doesn’t count on falling for her in the process.

Love’s Prayer by Melissa Storm. In this sweet Christian romance, Summer arrives in town to run her aunt’s flower shop for several weeks. Ben, who despairs over his life ever getting better after his brother’s suicide ruined his family life, takes a chance on prayer–a prayer that’s immediately answered when Summer delivers a mysterious flower arrangement to his home. This is a fast, clean read set in a town that sounds like a wonderful place to live. Its message: love changes things, if you let it. First in a series.

Love’s Promise by Melissa Storm. Second in the First Street Church Romance series, this novel (like the previous one) is a quick, fun read. The Christian characters openly pray, attend church services and functions, and read the Bible, but the reader won’t feel like they’re being beaten over the head with religious platitudes. In this story, Kristina undergoes gastric bypass surgery and her coworker Jeff struggles with his father’s professional expectations for him as well as his feelings for Kristina. A meddling friend convinces him to keep his affection to himself (against his better judgment) while Kristina wonders if Jeff could ever fall for a girl with a weight problem.

The Bookshop on Rosemary Lane by Ellen Berry. After the death of her mother, a cookbook collector whose volumes are stored all over her home, Della decides to open a bookshop to sell the cookbooks and encourage community. Along the way, she learns some of the secrets her mother was keeping and discovers how to handle the breakdown of her own marriage. Some things fall into place a little too conveniently, but it’s a fun read.

Children’s/YA

McCracken and the Lost Lady by Mark Adderley. Readers will enjoy the suspense and adventure that follows McCracken as he travels the world with his wife and toddler plus a fascinating crew from all over the world–in a zeppelin complete with its own library, chef’s kitchen, and a wealth of scientific equipment. For ages 10 and up. Read my full review. (ARC provided by author.)

Turning in Circles by Michelle Buckman. “If only we had known.” That’s the refrain at the heart of Michelle Buckman’s latest novel for teens: Turning in Circles, a story of sisters, small-town secrets and teenage rebellion. The novel is a study in character contrast. Savannah, busy covering for her sister who’s sneaking off to meet Dillon, uncovers way too many long-buried secrets as she seeks a way to protect her sister from her boyfriend. You know this won’t end well, but the ending is not what you expect. At the same time, it’s the only ending possible. This novel for teen readers is a study in contrasts. Read my full review. (ARC provided by author.)

Nonfiction

When the Timer Dings: Organizing Your Life to Make the Most of 10 Minute Increments by Katharine Grubb. While the author calls herself the “10 Minute Novelist,” this book on time- and life-management is not simply for writers. Anyone who works from home will benefit from the wisdom and the exercises at the end of each chapter. Katharine is honest about the challenges those who work at home (especially parents who work at home) face, and shares family-tested solutions for handling those challenges.

Our Lady of Fatima: 100 Years of Stories, Prayers and Devotions by Donna-Marie Cooper O’Boyle. For those who wonder what the Blessed Mother’s apparitions 100 years ago to three young shepherd children in Portugal could possibly mean for Catholics today, Donna-Marie Cooper O’Boyle’s new book provides both context and inspiration. Each chapter concludes with a section inviting the reader to consider the impact of Fatima for ourselves. My full review is at CatholicMom.com. (ARC provided by publisher)

Heads Bowed: Prayers for Catholic School Days by Lisa Mladinich. This book of prayers can be used by catechists, Catholic-school teachers or homeschooling parents. Prayers are organized a week at a time, and include liturgical-year themes as well as themes related to common school issues. There are even two weeks of prayers for teachers to use as they prepare for the upcoming school year. (ARC provided by publisher)

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

open book new logo

Copyright 2017 Barb Szyszkiewicz

#OpenBook: March 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

Rightfully Ours coverRightfully Ours by Carolyn Astfalk. In this refreshing YA romance, readers have the chance to get into the head of the romantic hero. Paul lives in the Muellers’ guesthouse during his father’s deployment. He and Rachel, his landlords’ daughter, find their friendship turning into something deeper; while they struggle against temptation and Rachel’s dad’s opposition to their relationship, they discover historic artifacts buried beneath Rachel’s flower garden. I found Paul to be a more likable character than Rachel, perhaps because she is a few years younger than he and a little more immature. Full review coming Friday! (ARC)

upsie daisyUpsie-Daisy: The Adventures of Lee and Bucky Book 999 by Jane Lebak. I’m a big fan of the Lee and Bucky adventures, and this prequel did not disappoint! The story introduces Lee, a clever mechanic who loves her job but can’t bring herself to tell anyone where she works–and whose mother writes resignation letters and mails them to Lee’s boss. You’ll also meet Bucky, Lee’s guardian angel who likes listening to Fleetwood Mac, is quick with the witty banter, and is all about seeing to the state of Lee’s soul. Lebak creates terrific characters and puts them in interesting situations.

sleepingwitness.inddThe Sleeping Witness: A Father Gabriel Mystery by Fiorella deMaria. I read this fast-paced mystery in a single cozy evening. Father Gabriel and his monastic cohorts are a fascinating cast of characters, though I’d have liked more character development. Father Gabriel finds himself defending Dr. Paige, a man he admits is unlikable and who appears guilty–but the priest is convinced there’s more behind the attack on the doctor’s wife. Set in postwar England, the book touches on some harrowing consequences of the war and the secrets borne even by residents of a sleepy, remote hamlet. Read my full review. (ARC)

almost missed youAlmost Missed You by Jessica Strawser. Violet, Finn and their little boy are enjoying a beach vacation when Finn takes their son to their hotel room for a nap–but makes a clean getaway with the little boy instead. This novel turns upon things that almost didn’t happen: all those tiny incidences that, when put together, shape a life. The tale also centers on the secrets we keep–and the ones we share–and the ways in which betrayal of those secrets threatens to tear everything apart. The seeming perfection of Violet and Finn’s marriage is undone by those secrets–the kind that, the longer you keep them, ensnare you all the more. (Netgalley)

making facesMaking Faces by Amy Harmon. A complicated, and very worthwhile, story of sacrificial love. Fern is a romantic at heart–she wants to be the next bestselling author of Harlequin novels–and spends most of her time as a caring companion for her cousin Bailey, who suffers from a degenerative nerve disease and considers himself useless. Fern doesn’t think she has a chance with the handsome Ambrose, who tries to leave the pressures of competitive wrestling behind to enlist in the military with a group of his classmates. When Ambrose is the only one of the group to survive a bomb blast, the whole town is turned upside-down, and Ambrose’s disfigurement makes him believe he’s unworthy of love. Worth it for the surprise ending.

granny torelli makes soupGranny Torelli Makes Soup by Sharon Creech. Sweet novel for middle-grade readers. A grandmother teaches her granddaughter and her best friend, a boy from across the street, some life lessons while they cook pasta and soup. The children are navigating the difficult world of jealousy in friendship, and parallels to Granny Torelli’s own life help them figure out better ways of handling things.

Nonfiction

getting past perfectGetting Past Perfect by Kate Wicker. We need to acknowledge that there’s a difference between perfectionism and striving for excellence. This book offers a great deal of encouragement to moms at all stages of mothering. Read my full review.

 

all inAll In: Why Belonging to the Catholic Church Matters by Pat Gohn. Readers on any stop along their faith journey can benefit from the wisdom and action steps provided here, on their way to going “all in.” Read my full review.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

open book new logo

 

Copyight 2017 Barb Szyszkiewicz

#OpenBook: February 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

vanishedVanished (The Memoirs of Jane_E, Friendless Orphan, book 3) by Erin McCole Cupp. Easily my favorite of the three books in the series, Vanished brings the near-future dystopian retelling of Jane Eyre to a satisfying conclusion. Author Erin McCole Cupp’s fine attention to technical details creates a world that, chillingly, could be nearer than we’d think. More so than in the other books, Jane_E’s need to live with integrity is the driving force in the story.

intermissionIntermission by Serena Chase. Faith’s mother continually tries to squash her Broadway dreams for a more practical profession, accusing Faith of flightiness and bad behavior even as she ignores worse behavior from Faith’s older sister. Faith’s budding romance with a slightly-older actor with similar musical-theatre dreams leads her mother to forbid the two to have any contact. Faith impatiently waits until Noah completes a 2-year program of study overseas, but as she’s unable to get in touch with Noah, she has no idea if he will return to her. This YA romance novel has a strong, but not overbearing, Christian element. Some characters openly evaluate their own behavior according to godly standards, and the subject of chastity, purity and reputation are openly discussed and central to the story. The suspense in this novel is its greatest asset. Chase admirably moves the plot along, while bringing the reader to tears–and sometimes to anger–over the events taking place. Highly recommended for high-school students.

mothers-promiseThe Mother’s Promise by Sally Hepworth. This book will absolutely tear you apart emotionally. Alice fiercely protects her daughter, Zoe, who suffers from severe social anxiety. When Alice is diagnosed with late-stage ovarian cancer, the two are forced to leave their insular world and take radical steps out of their comfort zones, finding support from a nurse, a social worker and a high-school boy, all of whom face their own secret challenges. Bring tissues, but don’t skip it. (Netgalley)

hope-chestThe Hope Chest by Viola Shipman. Such a sweet story with absolutely lovable characters, in a town you’ll want to move into. Single-mom Rose finds work caring for Mattie, an ALS patient. Rose and young daughter Jeri find their way into Mattie’s heart, as well as her husband Don’s. Together they all learn to face death by focusing on hope: specifically, the various treasures found in Mattie’s long-neglected hope chest. (Netgalley)

 

wedding-in-truhartA Wedding in Truhart by Cynthia Tennent. Annie has to plan a wedding suitable for her TV-news-star sister and all the Atlanta society folk traveling to humble Truhart, Michigan for the festivities. This novel is all about appearances and what really matters. The love story between Annie and her old crush, Nick, is the main part of the novel. 2 unnecessarily-graphic sex scenes.

 

 

close-enough-to-touchClose Enough to Touch by Colleen Oakley. Imagine being allergic to the human touch. Jubilee has lived most of her life unable to touch or be touched by others. Now that her mother has died, she must find a way to support herself. She nearly dies after giving in to instinct, jumping into a river to save a drowning child and resuscitating him. She falls for the child’s dad–and he for her–but cannot bring herself to tell him why she keeps him at arm’s length. (Netgalley)

heavenawaitsfrontcover-768x1152Heaven Awaits by Shannon Claire Morelli. Emily McDougal’s purchase of her first home sets off a chain of events leading to friendship with a neighbor old enough to be her mother, a new romance, and renewed commitment to her Catholic faith. But both she and Tim bear old wounds from past relationships, and Tim has other discerning to do as well. A sweet novel of new beginnings and healing past hurts.

Nonfiction

PrintSaint Junípero Serra’s Camino: A Pilgrimage Guide to the California Missions by Stephen J. Binz. (Franciscan Media) An impressively comprehensive guidebook of the 21 California missions featuring a short biography of St. Junípero Serra, a look at the colonial and missionary climate of the 18th century, and separate chapters for each mission. Readers are invited to take walking, driving or virtual pilgrimages in which they learn the history of each mission site, examine its architecture, discover its patron saint and engage in prayer. Lack of color photos is my only negative about this book. (ARC received from publisher)

country-betweenA Country Between: Making a Home where Two Sides of Jerusalem Collide by Stephanie Saldana. Several years in the life of a woman who lives in an intentionally non-intentional way. She appears driven by whim rather than purpose. The memoir begins at her arrival at a monastery in Syria, where she falls in love with a young French monk; he eventually leaves the monastery to marry her. They settle in a war-torn corner of Jerusalem, arriving at an apartment as the result of a seemingly-random sequence of events, and she decides it’s imperative to have a child after a traumatic incident on the street. I can’t understand her insistence on continuing to live and raise her children in a war zone when she clearly has opportunities to live elsewhere. The writing is poetic and evocative.(Netgalley)

meeting-god-in-the-upper-roomMeeting God in the Upper Room: Three Moments to Change Your Life by Msgr. Peter J. Vaghi (Franciscan Media). Msgr. Varghi’s discussion of the history of the Upper Room based on Gospel accounts complements the meditations that are the meat of this book. I found the history fascinating; in various chapters, you’ll read about personalities, prophecy, sacraments, and Catholic social teaching. Each chapter ends with a section titled “Preparing Your Upper Room” in which the reader is invited to consider the personal implications of Jesus’ message. Read my full review. (ARC received from publisher)

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

Copyright 2017 Barb Szyszkiewicz

open book new logo

 

#OpenBook: January 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

this-dread-roadThis Dread Road by Olivia Folmar Ard. An intriguing tale of two young women, a generation apart, who must learn to live with the consequences of romantic choices they make–and one man who figures prominently in both their lives. Annemarie, a college freshman far from home and the reach of her overbearing mother’s attempts to set her up with every eligible bachelor in the region, falls hard for a man her parents certainly wouldn’t approve of. Her immaturity leads her to handle all of this the wrong way, with results that prove disastrous for her family relationship, her mental health and her love life. 50 years later, that same man mentors Claire, an heiress trying to escape her own mother and her own past. This book is third in a series, but you don’t have to have read the others to enjoy it–I recommend you do read them all, though!(Review based on ebook ARC provided by author)

abbys-journeyAbby’s Journey by Steena Holmes. I eagerly anticipated this sequel to Saving Abby, but did not enjoy this book as much as the first. Set 18 years after Abby’s birth and her mother’s death, the book finds a father mired in his grief and beset by (understandable) worry over the fragile health of his only child. Every aspect of the family’s life is controlled by the various lists and journals that were left behind by her mother, Claire. Josh must face his demons when, against his better judgment, extended family members take Abby on the trip of a lifetime–a trip that could cost her life. (Netgalley review; releases 2/14)

blessingsThe Blessings by Elise Juska. A family saga told in vignettes, this novel is set in northeast Philadelphia. As it is a saga, I wanted more–more of the day-to-day life of this family that was depicted in a true-to-life manner. In some cases, years would elapse between events in the various chapters. The story is told from multiple points of view. Recommended for the local color, but there needs to be more to the story.

merry-maryMerry Mary by Ashley Farley. Short novella describing a photojournalist who gets a little too involved in the homeless community she’s studying–right down to taking a baby from a crime scene, then trying to figure out ways to keep the child as she struggles with her own failing marriage and frequent miscarriages. As the story went on I had less and less sympathy for Scottie.

rejected-writers-book-clubThe Rejected Writers Book Club by Suzanne Kelman. The town librarian is invited to a mysterious club meeting for a quirky group of authors whose books are never accepted. When she needs to leave town to care for her high-maintenance pregnant daughter, Janet finds herself accompanied by several writers trying to avert publication of a book containing family secrets. So far-fetched, but definitely a fun read.

Nonfiction

a-sea-without-a-shore-coverA Sea Without a Shore by Jeannie Ewing. Ewing’s words will resonate with readers who feel alone in their pain. While this book is centered on suffering, it is infused with hope. The meditations in chapter 8 (“Faith, Hope and Charity”) are some of the most powerful ones in the book. This, I’m sure, is no accident: these are powerful virtues, as they must be to conquer the despair that can so easily come to those beaten down by life’s difficulties. These meditations are not casual or flip: they are heartfelt, reverent outpourings of the soul. The language is formal, even poetic, with a unique cadence. Written in the first person, each meditation invites the soul to cling to God in prayer. (ARC ebook provided by author)

three-little-wordsThree Little Words by Ashley Rhodes-Courter. I picked up this book on the recommendation of a friend’s daughter who is studying social work. Three Little Words is an honest and harrowing account of life in the foster-care system. The author spent most of her childhood in 14 different foster homes. In some, she received loving care; in others, she was severely abused and saw other children receiving similar treatment. Rhodes-Courter owns her bad behavior and shows true concern for the other children experiencing abuse and neglect in foster care.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

open book new logo

 

#OpenBook: November 2016 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

different-heroismA Different Heroism (Father Jay book 3) by Jane Lebak. Third in a series, this novel covers further ground in Father Jay and his brother Kevin’s contentious relationship, Jay’s impromptu shelter for homeless/neglected boys, and Jay’s ongoing health issues. A shaky truce with his brother and an order from his bishop force Jay into a week’s vacation–and everything starts to fall apart with the gang of “Archangels” he shelters. A fast-paced and enjoyable read. I’m a fan of these characters and eagerly await more Father Jay stories.
tis-the-season‘Tis the Season by Olivia Folmar Ard. In an age of oversharing, a young couple trying to conceive and battling Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) struggles to keep their health issues private. Ironic much? Even more so, considering Lauren spends a lot of time creating and maintaining the perfect social-media persona. And there’s nothing like a holiday trip to see her in-laws to threaten to dismantle all that online perfection. Despite my distaste for “rushing the season” in so many other ways, I’m always up to read a good Christmas story, and this novella did not disappoint.
most-highly-favored-daughterMost Highly Favored Daughter: A Sanctified Suspense by Janice Lane Palko. Set in Pittsburgh against the backdrop of the Super Bowl, this novel tells a harrowing story of human trafficking with an unexpected twist. Heiress Cara Wells is framed with the horrible crime of abusing a young child–but she remembers nothing of what happened that night after falling violently ill. Resolved to untangle the mystery and rescue the young victim of the crime, Cara puts even her marriage and her life on the line. Great local color. (Review copy received from author)
what-lightWhat Light by Jay Asher. Sierra spends 11 months of the year on a Christmas tree farm. The rest of the year she lives in a trailer at a tree lot, hours away from home. This might be her family’s last year at the tree lot, and she’s determined to make the most of it. She’s also determined to give the cute guy who buys trees for poor families a change, even though plenty of locals warn her that he’s trouble. Great premise, well-told story. Appropriate for high-school students (and it’s not even R-rated!) Reads like a Hallmark Christmas movie, which is not at all a bad thing.
christmas-clubThe Christmas Club by Barbara Hinske. Cute Christmas romance novella; a woman loses an envelope of money–all she has for Christmas gifts. Two kindhearted people replace the money, then separately learn how the people who found the lost cash were impacted by the windfall. A series of near misses for the two who replaced the money keeps the story going. This is a sweet, feel-good Christmas story and a quick read.
grace-crasherThe Grace Crasher by Mara Faro. In love with being in love, Julia obsesses over finding an affordable apartment right near her latest crush, a musician who makes her feel like the only person in his audience. Problem is, the only place her budget can handle comes with strings attached: she has to pretend she’s a born-again Christian. What’s an erstwhile Catholic girl to do? And how will she handle it when her landlady’s son discovers that she’s not the person she pretends to be? I enjoyed the local setting of this novel, and I think I’ve been to the Christian bookstore that figures so prominently in the plot (or one suspiciously like it). A great take on infatuation vs. love, speaking the truth in love, and being true to yourself.
someday-someday-maybeSomeday, Someday, Maybe by Lauren Graham. Cute story of a struggling aspiring actress in NYC whose self-sabotaging behavior makes for a fun read, with a little bit of audience frustration thrown in for good measure. WHY does she have to go for the wrong guy? WHY does she go with THAT agent? My favorite part: the pages ripped straight from Franny’s Filofax, between each chapter. Franny’s roommates are terrific characters and merit stories of their own!
destiny-of-sunshine-ranchThe Destiny of Sunshine Ranch by T.M. Gaouette. This novel peeks into the world of children in foster care, kids who have experienced things no child ever should. Sunshine Ranch is the home of a vulnerable child’s dreams, with loving, faithful couple Martha and David caring for and educating 10 children who are in the foster-care system. Life at the ranch is not without its challenges, especially for 10-year-old Benedict who has had things particularly rough. This heartwarming tale has an unexpected ending.
more-than-a-promiseMore than a Promise by Ruth Logan Herne. Grieving the very public breakup of her marriage, artist Elle returns to her hometown to set up her studio and start over. She’s equally captivated and irritated by the 3 young motherless boys next door, left to run wild while their father runs the family business. When the boys’ grandmother threatens the only home they’d ever known, Elle comes up with a crazy scheme to keep the family together and announces her engagement to their dad. The premise is pretty far-fetched, but this novel is worth reading just for the great portrayals of the children.
when-you-reach-meWhen You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead. This novel for middle-school students follows a city kid who’s on her own after school and must navigate a world that includes the usual middle-school friendship dramas, plus gang violence, homelessness and a series of mysterious notes. There’s a time-travel element as well. Great suspense!
beyond-carouselBeyond the Carousel. Bette Lee Crosby continues her Wyattsville saga with yet another story that reinforces my wish to live in a town just like it. This novel spans three generations of a family whose happy life is shattered by a senseless, unsolved murder. Detective Jack Mahoney, out of love for the granddaughter of the murder victim, stakes his career on solving the crime. Don’t think this is just a mystery, though–it’s a three-generation love story.
(Review based on advance reader copy via Socialbook.) This novel will be released in January 2017.

Nonfiction

fearless-lg-coverFearless by Sonja Corbitt puts fear and anxiety into a different perspective, framing them as spiritual attacks and providing tools with which to vanquish them. In short, Fearless is all about spiritual warfare. A mix of personal testimony, quotes from Scripture and the saints and plenty of wise counsel round out this book, which begs to be read (and reread) slowly and with pen and journal close by. Read my full review. (Review copy received from publisher)

Teresa-21Advent with St. Teresa of Calcutta by Heidi Hess Saxton. Heidi Hess Saxton has collected some of Saint Teresa of Calcutta’s most inspiring words and paired them with prayers, daily Mass readings and calls to action in a newly-published seasonal daily devotional. Advent with Saint Teresa of Calcutta: Daily Meditations offers food for thought and prayer for any reader who is devoted to this fascinating saint. Read my full review. (Review copy received from publisher)

who-does-he-say-you-areWho Does He Say You Are? by Colleen C. Mitchell. Expect to be surprised, challenged and changed. Colleen brings out the qualities in several Gospel women that are in every woman, and directs our spiritual journey as we discover how we can be healed as they were. Throughout the book, she shares her own journey of brokenness, faith, healing and trust. The Questions for Reflection at the end of each chapter aren’t merely journal prompts: they are calls to action. (Review copy received from publisher)

missing-kennedyThe Missing Kennedy by Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff. Examining the lives of Rosemary Kennedy and the Franciscan nun who cared for her during most of her adult life, Pentacoff’s book connects a privileged handicapped woman who lived a sequestered life with the very ordinary women who ministered to and visited her. The author grew up around Rosemary Kennedy, who was cared for by Sister Paulus, the author’s aunt. Koehler-Pentacoff, along with her parents, was present for holidays, birthdays and ordinary days with Rosemary Kennedy. This is a chronicle of an era when mental illness was misunderstood, and treatments for mental illness were dramatically different than the treatment available today. The book is not a comprehensive biography of Rosemary Kennedy, but the story of how Ms. Kennedy’s life intersected with that of the author. (I received an advance copy from the publisher for the purposes of this review.)

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

open book new logo

An Open Book: October 2016 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

image-and-likenessImage and Likeness: Literary Reflections on the Theology of the Body, edited by Erin McCole Cupp and Ellen Gable. What, exactly, are “literary reflections on the Theology of the Body?” They’re stories and poems about how we live, and how we live our lives in relationship with each other, with our bodies, with our souls, and with God. It’s not some complicated, esoteric subject. Because it’s an anthology, there’s something for everyone, from detective stories to poetry to tales of family life that range from the harrowing to the uplifting. These stories and poems are about life. Like life, they are not always neat and tidy and packaged in a pretty box with a crisply-tied ribbon. I’ve come to expect just this from other work from Full Quiver Publishing: this publisher does not shy away from difficult subjects and situations in its commitment to promoting the culture of life and the Church’s teaching on marriage and family. Read my full review. (ARC provided by author)

og-front-cover-finalOrnamental Graces by Carolyn Astfalk. This is no Harlequin/gothic/bodice-ripper/shades-of-grey novel. That’s not Carolyn Astfalk’s style. Ornamental Graces, like her previous novel, Stay with Me, is a Catholic romance with Theology of the Body underpinning the story. This novel tells the story of the on-again, off-again romance between Emily, a young teacher obsessed with all things French, and Dan, whose wounds from a past relationship make him wary of starting over. There are some terrific peripheral characters as well; you’ll want to adopt Grandma. Will Dan be able to finally put his past behind him and open up to new love? Read my full review. (ARC provided by author)

i-believe-you-by-jeanne-grunertI Believe You by Jeanne Grunert. David Majek and his sons are still finding their way 6 months after his wife was killed by a hit-and-run driver who was never apprehended for the crime. Then strange things start happening: a man in a fedora is watching the house, David’s bank account is drained of funds overnight, and as David struggles to maintain his household, run the family business and untangle these mysteries, details come to light that threaten to tear the family apart. I don’t usually read suspense novels, preferring fare that is more character-driven. But I found that David Majek’s character was quite well-developed in this novel, and it didn’t take long for me to get drawn into the story. Read my full review. (Review copy provided by author)

journey-to-the-crossJourney to the Cross by Shane Cloonan. The story in this children’s picture book is told from the point of view of the donkey who carried the Blessed Mother to Bethlehem, where she would give birth to Jesus; in this tale, the same donkey carried Jesus on his triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Passion Sunday, 33 years later. This book by a teenage author is worth adding to your Christmas-book basket. (ARC received from publisher)

unexpected-roleAn Unexpected Role by Leslea Wahl. This YA book is about a high-school theatre geek who doesn’t fit in with the cool kids and who’s been the target of some in-person pranks and cyberbullying. Seeking a fresh start, she spends the summer with her aunt, only to keep running into one of the cool kids from home. Josie and Ryan get wrapped up in trying to solve a rash of local robberies. Great characters, painfully real situations, mystery and even a love interest–with some wisdom in the side. (I liked Wahl’s other work so much I preordered this one as soon as I heard about it!)

under-rose-tainted-skiesUnder Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall. A housebound teenager battles agoraphobia and OCD. Left home alone for weeks while her mother goes on a business trip and recovers from a car accident, Norah develops a friendship with the boy next door, who shows her that not everyone sees her as a freak. The author does well at getting into the head of a teen battling mental illness, but the concept of leaving so unstable a teen home alone for any length of time didn’t ring true. (Netgalley review)

unnamed-9Nameless by Erin McCole Cupp. This second in a 3-part futuristic sendup of Charlotte Bronte’s classic Jane Eyre will keep you up nights! In Nameless, Jane_E is now employed as a live-in tutor for her employer’s young ward, and works there several weeks before meeting her employer. Once she does, though, sparks begin to fly! As Jane_E is convinced of her own ugliness, awkwardness and unworthiness, she questions Thorne’s motives and doubts his sincerity. Inevitably, romance ensues–but then the mysterious source of strange household events is revealed, and this threatens Jane_E’s integrity as well as her relationship with Thorne. I found this installment of the story even more suspenseful than the first part. Highly recommended! Read my full review. (ARC provided by author)

Nonfiction

loehr-2aThe Church is Our Mother by Gina Loehr. The author breaks down the functions of the Church into 7 activities which every mother is familiar with doing: creating, caring, teaching, accepting, sacrificing, healing and celebrating. Loehr compares the work of a mother with the work of the Church in concrete ways. Read my full review. (ARC provided by publisher)

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

open book new logo

#OpenBook: September 2016 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

Review of "The Perfect Blindside" at Franciscanmom.comThe Perfect Blindside by Leslea Wahl. Told from dual points of view, this novel follows Jake, a self-described “snowboarding phenom” and teenage Olympian with a chip on his shoulder and his classmate Sophie, a small-town girl who’s proud of it–and who tends to geek out over local history. With true-to-life characters, an intriguing mystery and a setting so real you’ll imagine yourself walking down Main Street, this novel had me saying “Just one more chapter” over and over again. Read my full review.

silver-threadsSilver Threads by Bette Lee Crosby. Fate takes a starring role in this novel as the Keeper of the Scales tries to equalize the balance of happiness and unhappiness in people’s lives. Unable to prevent the tragic from occurring, all the compassionate Keeper can do is try to equalize balance after it is tipped too far in an unhappy direction. He’s a peripheral character but a very important one, and the reader sympathizes with his difficult task even as they mourn tragedies that tear apart families. 5th in Bette Lee Crosby’s “Memory House” series, this book can stand alone (but why would you want it to? The characters that populate this series are wonderful! This review is based on a Netgalley copy of the book.

rosa-solaRosa, Sola by Carmela Martino. Rosa wants nothing more than a baby brother of her own. But this is more than simple envy over her best friend’s new baby brother. Rosa is an only child, and in 1960s Chicago, that’s a rarity–and she feels like an outsider among all her friends with their large families. Rosa’s wish comes true, but she blames herself for the tragic events that follow. Recommended for readers 10 and up. As this is a sensitive topic, parents will appreciate the classroom discussion guide at the end of the book (it’s great for family discussion as well!)

promise-kitchenThe Promise Kitchen by Peggy Lampman. The story of two women from completely different walks of life: Shelby is an undereducated teen mom who wants her daughter to have better opportunities; Mallory is a high-powered food blogger with old money behind her. They’re linked by a love of good food, though Mallory looks down on Shelby, who works in the supermarket deli. I couldn’t like Mallory no matter how hard I tried; I just could not muster sympathy for this character. (Netgalley review)

things-we-wish-were-trueThe Things We Wish Were True by Marybeth Mayhew Whalen. This is a story of a neighborhood that’s full of secrets. Every time you think you’ve gotten to the last one, there’s another secret waiting that’s worse than the one before. The town looks perfect on the outside but everyone is hiding something–but the worst secret of all is right under everyone’s nose, and it takes a middle-schooler to discover it. Multiple points of view make the story difficult to follow at times. (Netgalley review)

wonderWonder by R.J. Palacio. Excellent book for middle-school readers about a 5th-grader with a craniofacial deformity who learns to make his way in school after years of homeschooling. Told from multiple points of view, the story follows Auggie as he and his family navigate middle-school social pressures on top of very visible medical issues.

ciao-bellaCiao, Bella: A Novel about Searching for Beauty and Finding Love by Ryan M. Phillips. There was so much I wanted to like about this book. Mack owns a bookstore. She’s committed to her faith. She’s the poster child for reality shows like “What Not to Wear.” But she lets her newfound glamour go to her head and tear her away from what (and who) really matters. For well over half the book, you watch her make one bad decision after another as she lets herself be pursued and pushed around by a handsome movie star who’s looking for arm candy. Resolution in the story comes in the last 3 pages, at which point the tale slams to a screeching halt.

Nonfiction

feeding-your-familys-soul-dmcobFeeding Your Family’s Soul by Donna-Marie Cooper O’Boyle. As you cook, chat and pray your way through this book, you and your family will learn about virtues, Church tradition, sacraments, works of mercy, prayers, forming consciences and more. My favorite part of each chapter is the “Extra Credit” where family members are invited to go beyond the lesson and carry out what is learned in some aspect of daily life. These activities can be done by anyone old enough to be in school. Read my full review.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

open book new logo

 

###

This month I’m joining all the cool kids in the #Write31Days adventure! I didn’t pick a keyword or a theme, because just getting something written for all 31 days is challenge enough for me right now.

#OpenBook: August 2016 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading. We went on vacation during August, so I had plenty of time to savor some good novels!

Fiction

pretty-lies-other-storiesPretty Lies and Other Stories by Olivia Folmar Ard. Short stories and poetry, all first-person and nearly all anonymous. Ard’s short fiction is very short indeed–the longest selections are a few pages long, but she wastes no words in telling very detailed slice-of-life tales.

 

anne-green-gables-collectionAnne of Green Gables and Anne of Avonlea by L.M. Montgomery. Not just for middle-schoolers; I found more to like in Marilla this time around. When I was a tween/teen, she was the villain in the novels! Anne is captivating and wise beyond her years. The second book is less compelling than the first, but still worthwhile. I wasn’t motivated to read more in the series, though.

saving-abbySaving Abby by Steena Holmes. Steena Holmes gets you hooked on a character and then turns your expectations and emotions inside-out in this novel about a husband and wife who want nothing more than to become parents. A devastating diagnosis threatens the life of both the unborn baby and the mother-to-be.

everything-we-keepEverything We Keep by Kerry Lonsdale. She should be dressed in a bridal gown instead of attending her fiance’s funeral. Aimee never saw the body, either. So when a psychic approaches her after the service with claims that her fiance is still alive, she HAS to follow up. This is a novel of grief, the power of love, and letting go.

pug-listThe Pug List by Alison Hodgson. Read after I heard part of an author interview on the Jennifer Fulwiler Show (Sirius/XM’s The Catholic Channel.) I just didn’t know what to make of this book sometimes. I’m aware that it was written after the trauma of a house fire (everyone was fine, but the home was a total loss) and the family was at loose ends as a result, but sometimes I felt that the emotion, expressed after the fact, seemed forced and overpowered the story the author was trying to tell.

unexpected-everythingThe Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson. YA novel about a politician’s daughter who loses an internship after her father’s political fall from grace. A dog-walking job introduces her to a young novelist and forces her to consider what really matters in terms of relationships and honesty. Good story of resilience and friendship.

life-listThe Life List by Lori Nelson Spielman. Brett’s mother is a high-powered cosmetics executive. After her death, 34-year-old Brett receives her life-goal list–written when she was only 14. Brett has 12 months to achieve those goals in order to receive her inheritance. An enjoyable, if predictable, read. There really weren’t too many plot twists, but I did like the characters and wanted to see how it all turned out.

recipe-by-candace-calvertThe Recipe by Candace Calvert. Short, sweet romance about a young woman seeking her way in the world, aided by a little blackmail, a stroke victim, an organic farmstand and a well-intentioned grandson. Good story with great characters!

Nonfiction

WLA-PWorks of Love are Works of Peace by Michael Collopy. While biographies are a wonderful way to get to know a person, they don’t always tell the whole story. Photographer Michael Collopy proves that images can say much more than words in this newly-reissued photobook from Ignatius Press, which documents the work of St. Teresa of Calcutta and her Missionaries of Charity. Originally published in 1996, the large-format book has been updated with an appendix containing the contents of the Missionaries of Charity daily prayer book as well as a most personal and profound letter on the interior life written by Mother Teresa during Holy Week of 1993 and addressed to her entire order. Described by the publisher as an “illustrated prayer book,” this book is an extended photo essay that brings home the radical life of service modeled by Blessed Mother Teresa and the Sisters. Full review here.

marys-wayMary’s Way: The Power of Entrusting Your Child to God by Judy Klein. This is both a testament to perseverance and a guide to surrender. Judy Klein shares her own heartbreaks as a mother, tracing her journey as a parent and a Catholic. But this book is more than a memoir: it’s a call to a very specific kind of prayer by mothers for their own children. Full review here.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

I received review copies of both nonfiction books from the publishers in exchange for my honest review. I purchased all the fiction books myself or borrowed them from the library. Opinions expressed here are mine alone.

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

open book new logo

An Open Book: May 2016

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

from here to homeFrom Here to Home by Marie Bostwick. An enjoyable novel IF you’ve read the others in the series; you won’t be as invested in the characters if you pick this one up on its own. In this story, a quilting-show host and her special-needs son and cohost risk losing their jobs when a new producer tries to turn a craft show into reality TV.

bulletproof vestmentsBulletproof Vestments, a short story by Jane Lebak. Father Jay, a priest who’s a former gang member, finds his life threatened by the brother of the man convicted of carjacking after Jay identified him as the suspect. Now crippled after serving a tour of duty in the Middle East, Jay has returned to minister to treet kids in the old neighborhood. Because this prequel will leave you wanting more, here’s the rest of Father Jay’s story. What’s next for Father Jay? I’m actually hoping for a pre-prequel!

regrets of cyrus doddThe Regrets of Cyrus Dodd by Bette Lee Crosby. Fourth in a series but works as a standalone. As Bette Lee Crosby’s books always do, this story carried me right along and captivated me with characters I’d love to know in person. This is the story of a man who focuses on what could have been, what he should have said or done, instead of celebrating what is. The novel is filled with touches of wisdom and populated with terrific characters connecting this story to other books by this author. (ARC provided by the author through SocialBook; releases mid-June)

LCLFrontCover-265x400Life-Changing Love by Theresa Linden. A standalone sequel to Roland West, Loner, this novel tells the story of Roland’s classmate Caitlyn, who at 15 is not allowed to date but who dearly wishes for a romantic relationship, competing for Roland’s attention with a girl who has no restrictions and seemingly few inhibitions. The characters’ Catholic faith is sensitively integrated into the narrative. This is a compelling novel that will appeal to readers in grade 7 and up. My full review with author interview is here.

Soaring Alone by Vickie S. Miller. This suspense novel has a great premise, but I thought there were a few too many holes in the plot or things that didn’t get explained thoroughly enough. Rachel, a young wife and mom who’s already in therapy, receives a phone call telling her that she had been kidnapped from the hospital as an infant, that the media already knows this and that her birth mom wants to meet her.  As a reader, I wanted more detail about how Rachel got from the kidnapper to the family who raised her, and less about her (completely explainable, given the circumstances) psychological troubles.

Nonfiction

keep your kids catholicKeep Your Kids Catholic by Marc Cardonarella. Marc Cardonarella maintains that you are the one who is your child’s primary catechist in his new book. Cardonarella shares concrete ways parents can secure their own faith, then structure their lives (and their teens’) to support growth in faith. My full review of this book is here.

Learning to Love with the Saints -- Front Cover 250 x 400Learning to Love with the Saints by Jean Heimann. In this book, Jean shares her own surprising and inspiring faith story, tracing a path walked with growing devotion and conviction. Learn how Jean’s life was influenced by the stories of the saints. My full review of this book is here.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

open book new logo