An Open Book: August 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently.

Working full-time doesn’t leave me much room for pleasure reading, so my book consumption has definitely slowed. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

maggies wayLinda Bradley, Maggie’s Way (Montana Bound Series book 1). Maggie, arguably, has it tough this summer. Her husband of 20+ years has just “come out” and divorced her, and she’s undergoing radiation for breast cancer with only her mom for support, because she won’t tell anyone else about it. And now she has a new next-door neighbor, a very needy little girl who’s been abandoned (over and over again) by her own mother, and whose father finds himself attracted to Maggie. While the main character of this novel was irritating at times, little Chloe stole my heart.

comfort of secretsChristine Nolfi, The Comfort of Secrets. Cat Mendoza wants her marketing job to work out so she can help save her small town. A new business associate, Ryan, proves to be more than a coworker–but complications from his past threaten their future. I liked how the story came full circle–and then some! This was a story and cast of characters that I had a hard time parting with; they’re still inhabiting my thoughts.

wedding miracleMelissa Storm, A Wedding Miracle. It’s no joke: a minister and a rabbi meet at the wedding of their good friends, and it soon becomes clear that they’re destined to be together. This short rom-com would make a terrific movie! It has that same “these two really do belong together” feel that you get when you watch “You’ve Got Mail.”

Children’s/YA

other side of freedomCynthia T. Toney, The Other Side of Freedom. In Prohibition-era Louisiana, Sal struggles with questions of right and wrong as an organized-crime ring forces family members into involvement with bootlegging, with heartbreaking results. Keeping the secret will keep Sal and his parents alive, but is it worth the cost of losing contact with friends and his beloved uncle? I love how the cover image focuses on the very worried eyes of the young man in this novel. Recommended for middle-school readers and young teens studying this period of American history. (ARC provided by author)

Nonfiction

busy lives and restless soulsBusy Lives & Restless Souls. I picked up this book because I knew nothing about Ignatian spirituality and I welcomed the chance to learn something new. As a pragmatic person, I found comfort in the practical advice that I learned is a hallmark of the Ignatian way of life and which is so clearly explained by author Becky Eldredge. (ARC received from publisher) Read my full review.
101 places to pray before you die101 Places to Pray Before You Die. Since many holy sites are closing due to lack of visitors and funding, like the St. Katharine Drexel Shrine near Philadelphia, PA, this book is a well-timed reminder to take the opportunity to visit such places while the opportunity still exists. Your visit supports the efforts of those who maintain and staff these churches, shrines and other sites. (ARC received from publisher) Read my full review.
friendship projectThe Friendship Project. This new book from Michele Faehnle and Emily Jaminet (Ave Maria Press, 2017) inspires women to foster friendships based on holy virtues. Friends since college, Michele and Emily write from their own experience, sharing the joys of their twenty-year friendship. Each chapter features a pair of women saints who were friends, and focuses on one virtue that will help us to become better friends and deepen our spiritual friendships. (ARC received from publisher) Read my full review.

 

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

Copyright 2017 Barb Szyszkiewicz

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#OpenBook: June 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

cinder alliaCinder Allia by Karen Ullo. A Cinderella story like you’ve never heard it before, Cinder Allia fills in a grim backstory to the famous Grimm fairy tale. This novel answers the burning question every reader has about the fairy tale: why would Cinderella’s father allow her stepmother to treat her so badly? Ullo reveals Allia’s stepmother’s motives in keeping her in servitude and serves up a surprising twist in the form of a not-so-perfect Prince Charming. My full review is coming soon.(ARC received from author, who is a fellow member of the Catholic Writers Guild)

dying for compassionDying for Compassion (The Lady Doc Murders Book 2) by Barbara Golder. A murder mystery by an author whose mysteries include enough character development to satisfy readers like me who usually avoid that genre (and very little gore, especially considering the main character’s profession as the local coroner). Dying for Compassion puts a human face on the euthanasia debate and how it plays out in cases involving children and adults. (ARC received from publisher a fellow member of the Catholic Writers Guild)

shattered roseShattered Rose by T.L. Gray. A college student battling an eating disorder without a support system moves in with the wrong roommate and falls hard for the wrong guy, who happens to be her roommate’s cousin. If this isn’t challenging enough, the right guy comes along, and she doesn’t know how to trust him. Editing issues were distracting to this reader.

clairClair by Grace Greene. A sweet beach romance for sure, and a satisfying story. Clair’s friends get together at an exotic resort and put messages in bottles to see if they can attract romance. She does so halfheartedly because she’s already engaged. A year later, her heart is broken and she’s been conned out of her savings by that former fiance–but someone has found the message she put in the bottle and has come to seek her out. Part of the “Beach Brides” series written by multiple authors on a single theme.

sea keepers daughtersThe Sea Keeper’s Daughters by Lisa Wingate. Whitney, a restauranteur trying to save her business from a hostile takeover, returns to the defunct hotel her grandmother used to run in the Outer Banks. Her hopes of easy money from the inheritance of this hotel are complicated by her stubborn stepfather and unexpected romance. I’m a big fan of this author’s work. This is part of a series but it’s less a series than a group of connected books, so you won’t miss anything if you read it as a standalone.

rejected writers take the stageRejected Writers Take the Stage by Suzanne Kelman. This was entertaining, but less so than the first novel in the series (they do need to be read in order.) The rejected writers set out to save their friend Annie’s farm by writing and performing a stage play, resulting in a comedy of errors. Add in the narrator’s daughter, pregnant with twins and close to her due date but insisting on helping with the show, and there are predictable hijinks afoot.

feels like familyFeels like Family by Sherryl Woods. Single attorney Helen decides to go about her dream of having a family–against her friends’ advice, by deceiving the man who loves her. Helen was, for me, the least likable character in this novel. It’s part of a series; I’ll look forward to reading the others.

stars among the deadStars among the Dead by Marcy McKay. This book is a prequel to Pennies from Burger Heaven and in some ways even more difficult to handle. The subject matter–a young girl and her drug-addicted mother who turns to prostitution to support her habit and her child is harrowing. Graphic violence. (ARC received from author)

Nonfiction

costa-1Healing Promises: The Essential guide to the Sacred Heart by Anne Costa. This book is packed with opportunities for growth in prayer and devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Whether you’re already familiar with St. Margaret Mary’s revelations and their application in our lives or this topic is new to you, Costa’s book will invite you into a deeper practice of the Faith. Read my full review. (ARC received from publisher)

Overmyer-Soar-coverBorn to Soar: Unleashing God’s Word in Your Life by Melissa Overmyer. This journal is designed to be used over the course of six weeks, so it’s a perfect summer spiritual retreat. Each of the six chapters of the book corresponds to one of the stages in the life cycle of the caterpillar who ultimately becomes a beautiful butterfly. That science lesson we remember from grade school becomes a lesson for our souls in Born to SoarRead my full review. (ARC received from publisher)

that nothing may be lostThat Nothing May Be Lost: Reflections on Catholic Doctrine and Devotion by Father Paul Scalia. Father Paul Scalia’s new collection of essays has a unique structure: each chapter has an introduction written by a guest author, followed by several of Scalia’s own essays. Many of these were previously published as blog posts, monthly commentaries or bulletin columns. The detailed table of contents allows the reader to skip around as desired, choosing just the essay that invites itself to be read at that particular moment. The chapter introductions, by guest authors including Scott Hahn, Raymond Arroyo, Helen Alvaré and several others, may be read on their own as well. These essays provide not only important information, but an invitation to delve deeper into our faith through study, prayer and sacrament. I love that throughout this book, Father Scalia and his guest authors unfailingly express their own deep faith in God and affection for the Church and its traditions, welcoming the reader to ever more deeply participate in the life of faith. Read my full review. (ARC received from publisher)

witness to wonderWitness to Wonder by Regis Martin. Author and Franciscan University professor Dr. Regis Martin’s new book was written with committed Catholics in mind. Designed for the reader who wants to go deeper into the beauty and meaning of the Catholic faith, Witness to Wonder (Emmaus Road, 2017) delves into theology and poetry that energize Catholics in the appreciation and practice of the Faith. Read my full review.  (ARC received from publisher)

YOUCAT_BIBLEYOUCAT Bible. A two-page guide on reading the Bible is an eye-catching way to begin this book, designed for Catholic youth and young adults. This 10-step guide is supplemented with a quote from Catholic philosopher Peter Kreeft. Throughout this study Bible, quotes from popes, saints theologians, and famous contemporary Catholics appear in the margin notes along with explanations of vocabulary and customs and references to other related Bible verses. Read my full review.  (ARC received from publisher)

Children’s/YA

finding patienceFinding Patience (Adventures in Faith, Hope and Charity) by Virginia Lieto. The first book in the “Adventures of Faith, Hope and Charity” series is perfect for the emerging reader. This sweet story focuses on Faith, the oldest of three sisters, as the family moves to a new town. Lonely for friends, Faith doesn’t know how to go about finding friendship with kids her own age, and she quickly discovers that sitting back and waiting for friends to find her isn’t going to work. Faith’s mom empathizes with her and reassures her that all she needs is some patience. This book’s lessons on friendship and patience make it an ideal classroom read-aloud. “Finding Patience” ends with a prayer for patience, especially designed for the young reader. (ARC received from author, who is a fellow member of the Catholic Writers Guild)

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

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#OpenBook: May 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

The Memory of Butterflies by Grace Greene. Secrets have a way of coming out–and the longer you keep them, the deeper the repercussions. As Hannah prepares to send her daughter Ellen off to college, she begins rebuilding her childhood home, opening the door to the revelation of long-buried secrets that threaten the foundation of her family life. Hannah must decide whether to sacrifice herself to protect those she loves. Grace Greene has created a world that the reader will picture vividly. Some scenes will make you weep, and there are some good surprises in the story as well! (Netgalley review.)

Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate. This heartbreaking novel, based on a true story, follows several children from a Depression-era family who are snatched from their home and their parents under the guise of a corrupt social program that’s a cover for illegal adoptions. Parallel story lines detail the children’s experience in the Tennessee Children’s Home and the efforts of their modern-day grandchildren to uncover the mysteries surrounding their grandparents’ early lives in order to offer peace to their grandparents in their last days. (Netgalley review.)

Then Came You by Becky Wade. Carolyn got me interested in reading this author’s work after talking it up in last month’s Open Book. Then Came You is a novella that sets the stage for the Bradford Sisters Romance series: it’s the story of the three sisters’ early life with their father, Garner Bradford, heir to a huge shipping empire. The story is told through letters, phone conversations and journal entries.

True to You by Becky Wade. Nora Bradford, the middle daughter in the family, is a genealogist and owner/curator of a local historical village. Nora is still getting over a breakup several years ago, but she finds herself falling for the former Navy SEAL who’s hired her to locate his birth mother so he can find out more about his medical history.

Unquestionably Yours by Becky Wade. Oilman’s daughter Meg inherits her father’s business empire but doesn’t want any part of running it. When she decides to shut down his ranching enterprise, manager Bo Porter sets out to convince her to keep it open. He doesn’t count on falling for her in the process.

Love’s Prayer by Melissa Storm. In this sweet Christian romance, Summer arrives in town to run her aunt’s flower shop for several weeks. Ben, who despairs over his life ever getting better after his brother’s suicide ruined his family life, takes a chance on prayer–a prayer that’s immediately answered when Summer delivers a mysterious flower arrangement to his home. This is a fast, clean read set in a town that sounds like a wonderful place to live. Its message: love changes things, if you let it. First in a series.

Love’s Promise by Melissa Storm. Second in the First Street Church Romance series, this novel (like the previous one) is a quick, fun read. The Christian characters openly pray, attend church services and functions, and read the Bible, but the reader won’t feel like they’re being beaten over the head with religious platitudes. In this story, Kristina undergoes gastric bypass surgery and her coworker Jeff struggles with his father’s professional expectations for him as well as his feelings for Kristina. A meddling friend convinces him to keep his affection to himself (against his better judgment) while Kristina wonders if Jeff could ever fall for a girl with a weight problem.

The Bookshop on Rosemary Lane by Ellen Berry. After the death of her mother, a cookbook collector whose volumes are stored all over her home, Della decides to open a bookshop to sell the cookbooks and encourage community. Along the way, she learns some of the secrets her mother was keeping and discovers how to handle the breakdown of her own marriage. Some things fall into place a little too conveniently, but it’s a fun read.

Children’s/YA

McCracken and the Lost Lady by Mark Adderley. Readers will enjoy the suspense and adventure that follows McCracken as he travels the world with his wife and toddler plus a fascinating crew from all over the world–in a zeppelin complete with its own library, chef’s kitchen, and a wealth of scientific equipment. For ages 10 and up. Read my full review. (ARC provided by author.)

Turning in Circles by Michelle Buckman. “If only we had known.” That’s the refrain at the heart of Michelle Buckman’s latest novel for teens: Turning in Circles, a story of sisters, small-town secrets and teenage rebellion. The novel is a study in character contrast. Savannah, busy covering for her sister who’s sneaking off to meet Dillon, uncovers way too many long-buried secrets as she seeks a way to protect her sister from her boyfriend. You know this won’t end well, but the ending is not what you expect. At the same time, it’s the only ending possible. This novel for teen readers is a study in contrasts. Read my full review. (ARC provided by author.)

Nonfiction

When the Timer Dings: Organizing Your Life to Make the Most of 10 Minute Increments by Katharine Grubb. While the author calls herself the “10 Minute Novelist,” this book on time- and life-management is not simply for writers. Anyone who works from home will benefit from the wisdom and the exercises at the end of each chapter. Katharine is honest about the challenges those who work at home (especially parents who work at home) face, and shares family-tested solutions for handling those challenges.

Our Lady of Fatima: 100 Years of Stories, Prayers and Devotions by Donna-Marie Cooper O’Boyle. For those who wonder what the Blessed Mother’s apparitions 100 years ago to three young shepherd children in Portugal could possibly mean for Catholics today, Donna-Marie Cooper O’Boyle’s new book provides both context and inspiration. Each chapter concludes with a section inviting the reader to consider the impact of Fatima for ourselves. My full review is at CatholicMom.com. (ARC provided by publisher)

Heads Bowed: Prayers for Catholic School Days by Lisa Mladinich. This book of prayers can be used by catechists, Catholic-school teachers or homeschooling parents. Prayers are organized a week at a time, and include liturgical-year themes as well as themes related to common school issues. There are even two weeks of prayers for teachers to use as they prepare for the upcoming school year. (ARC provided by publisher)

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

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Copyright 2017 Barb Szyszkiewicz

#OpenBook: April 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

cherishCherish by A.J. Avila. Candice is a powerful DA who seems to have it all–but when she has a heart attack just before beginning the closing argument in the case that will make her career, she finds herself in a courtroom of a different sort. Now she must decide whether to repair a long-broken friendship with a former classmate, now dead; her eternal salvation depends on it. I couldn’t put this one down and will look for more from this author.

promise girlsThe Promise Girls by Marie Bostwick. A family of 3 “test-tube-baby” daughters, now adults, stays far away from their narcissistic, fame-seeking mother until an indie filmmaker decides to uncover the truth about their ancestry. I found the ending less than satisfying.

sandcastle sisterThe Sandcastle Sister by Lisa Wingate. I wish this story had been longer! It’s a return to a locale featured in previous Wingate novels. Editor Jen is torn between staying in Paris with author Evan…and suspects he might want to get married. But back at home, her sister is digging into family secrets and Jen needs to do some damage control. Enjoyable read.

sweet lakeSweet Lake by Christine Nolfi. A dutiful daughter takes on her fly-by-night brother in this fun novel, the first in a new series by Christine Nolfi. Linnie, struggling to keep afloat the inn that’s been her family’s business for several generations, has put her own dreams and her love life on hold while her brother (who was supposed to run the inn when he came of age but instead stole from the inn’s bank account and skipped town) enjoys life as a globetrotting filmmaker. It seemed to me that the novel was missing some back story; I felt that we were thrust into the middle of a drama without knowing the beginning.

idea of youThe Idea of You by Amanda Prowse. The pace and length of this novel was its biggest obstacle. The story of Lucy’s long-buried (and surprising) secret and how it affects all of her relationships was intriguing, but the telling of this story took too long. (Netgalley review)

Nonfiction

broken brain fortified faithBroken Brain, Fortified Faith by Virginia Pillars. Virginia Pillars’ memoir of a mother navigating the world of parenting a young adult with a brand-new diagnosis schizophrenia is at once heart-wrenching, informative and inspiring. Pillars honestly describes her day-by-day experience with her daughter’s illness and recovery, with a view toward helping other families whose lives are touched by a frustrating disease.
(ARC provided by author; full review coming soon!)

a gathering of larks by abigail carroll back (1)A Gathering of Larks: Letters to St. Francis from a Modern-Day Pilgrim by Abigail Carroll. A contemporary poet writes to St. Francis of Assisi as she explores his life with a focus on his choices, mistakes and faith. Abigail Carroll refuses to fall into the trap of stereotyping St. Francis–and that was a great relief. This book is highly recommended for anyone with a devotion to St. Francis of Assisi. Read my full review.

God is not fairGod is Not Fair, and Other Reasons for Gratitude by Dan Horan, OFM. A collection of essays exploring how “the very core of Christianity appears foolish in the world.” (p. 3) This makes it Franciscan to the core: St. Francis of Assisi spent his life as a “fool for Christ” in his quest to fully live the Gospel. Read my full review.

YA/Children’s Books

32 days32 Days: A Story of Faith and Courage by Ellen Lucey Prozeller. Historical fiction account of the life of a little girl in China who, with her family, was forced to practice her Catholic faith in secret. After her church was desecrated by Communist soldiers, Pei makes the risky decision to sneak into the church at night to pray before the Blessed Sacrament. The story is told from Pei’s point of view. Readers in grades 3 through 5 will learn about a child their own age who lives her faith in a time of oppression: a young, unknown Catholic hero.

con academyCon Academy by Joe Schreiber. Will has conned his way into an elite New England prep school, but discovers he’s not the only con artist there. Wagers abound as Will tries to avoid returning to a rundown Trenton, NJ neighborhood in disgrace. This mystery novel for middle-school and high-school readers was clever and entertaining, but the pace of the story was inconsistent.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

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Copyright 2017 Barb Szyszkiewicz

#OpenBook: February 2017 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

vanishedVanished (The Memoirs of Jane_E, Friendless Orphan, book 3) by Erin McCole Cupp. Easily my favorite of the three books in the series, Vanished brings the near-future dystopian retelling of Jane Eyre to a satisfying conclusion. Author Erin McCole Cupp’s fine attention to technical details creates a world that, chillingly, could be nearer than we’d think. More so than in the other books, Jane_E’s need to live with integrity is the driving force in the story.

intermissionIntermission by Serena Chase. Faith’s mother continually tries to squash her Broadway dreams for a more practical profession, accusing Faith of flightiness and bad behavior even as she ignores worse behavior from Faith’s older sister. Faith’s budding romance with a slightly-older actor with similar musical-theatre dreams leads her mother to forbid the two to have any contact. Faith impatiently waits until Noah completes a 2-year program of study overseas, but as she’s unable to get in touch with Noah, she has no idea if he will return to her. This YA romance novel has a strong, but not overbearing, Christian element. Some characters openly evaluate their own behavior according to godly standards, and the subject of chastity, purity and reputation are openly discussed and central to the story. The suspense in this novel is its greatest asset. Chase admirably moves the plot along, while bringing the reader to tears–and sometimes to anger–over the events taking place. Highly recommended for high-school students.

mothers-promiseThe Mother’s Promise by Sally Hepworth. This book will absolutely tear you apart emotionally. Alice fiercely protects her daughter, Zoe, who suffers from severe social anxiety. When Alice is diagnosed with late-stage ovarian cancer, the two are forced to leave their insular world and take radical steps out of their comfort zones, finding support from a nurse, a social worker and a high-school boy, all of whom face their own secret challenges. Bring tissues, but don’t skip it. (Netgalley)

hope-chestThe Hope Chest by Viola Shipman. Such a sweet story with absolutely lovable characters, in a town you’ll want to move into. Single-mom Rose finds work caring for Mattie, an ALS patient. Rose and young daughter Jeri find their way into Mattie’s heart, as well as her husband Don’s. Together they all learn to face death by focusing on hope: specifically, the various treasures found in Mattie’s long-neglected hope chest. (Netgalley)

 

wedding-in-truhartA Wedding in Truhart by Cynthia Tennent. Annie has to plan a wedding suitable for her TV-news-star sister and all the Atlanta society folk traveling to humble Truhart, Michigan for the festivities. This novel is all about appearances and what really matters. The love story between Annie and her old crush, Nick, is the main part of the novel. 2 unnecessarily-graphic sex scenes.

 

 

close-enough-to-touchClose Enough to Touch by Colleen Oakley. Imagine being allergic to the human touch. Jubilee has lived most of her life unable to touch or be touched by others. Now that her mother has died, she must find a way to support herself. She nearly dies after giving in to instinct, jumping into a river to save a drowning child and resuscitating him. She falls for the child’s dad–and he for her–but cannot bring herself to tell him why she keeps him at arm’s length. (Netgalley)

heavenawaitsfrontcover-768x1152Heaven Awaits by Shannon Claire Morelli. Emily McDougal’s purchase of her first home sets off a chain of events leading to friendship with a neighbor old enough to be her mother, a new romance, and renewed commitment to her Catholic faith. But both she and Tim bear old wounds from past relationships, and Tim has other discerning to do as well. A sweet novel of new beginnings and healing past hurts.

Nonfiction

PrintSaint Junípero Serra’s Camino: A Pilgrimage Guide to the California Missions by Stephen J. Binz. (Franciscan Media) An impressively comprehensive guidebook of the 21 California missions featuring a short biography of St. Junípero Serra, a look at the colonial and missionary climate of the 18th century, and separate chapters for each mission. Readers are invited to take walking, driving or virtual pilgrimages in which they learn the history of each mission site, examine its architecture, discover its patron saint and engage in prayer. Lack of color photos is my only negative about this book. (ARC received from publisher)

country-betweenA Country Between: Making a Home where Two Sides of Jerusalem Collide by Stephanie Saldana. Several years in the life of a woman who lives in an intentionally non-intentional way. She appears driven by whim rather than purpose. The memoir begins at her arrival at a monastery in Syria, where she falls in love with a young French monk; he eventually leaves the monastery to marry her. They settle in a war-torn corner of Jerusalem, arriving at an apartment as the result of a seemingly-random sequence of events, and she decides it’s imperative to have a child after a traumatic incident on the street. I can’t understand her insistence on continuing to live and raise her children in a war zone when she clearly has opportunities to live elsewhere. The writing is poetic and evocative.(Netgalley)

meeting-god-in-the-upper-roomMeeting God in the Upper Room: Three Moments to Change Your Life by Msgr. Peter J. Vaghi (Franciscan Media). Msgr. Varghi’s discussion of the history of the Upper Room based on Gospel accounts complements the meditations that are the meat of this book. I found the history fascinating; in various chapters, you’ll read about personalities, prophecy, sacraments, and Catholic social teaching. Each chapter ends with a section titled “Preparing Your Upper Room” in which the reader is invited to consider the personal implications of Jesus’ message. Read my full review. (ARC received from publisher)

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

Copyright 2017 Barb Szyszkiewicz

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#OpenBook: November 2016 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

different-heroismA Different Heroism (Father Jay book 3) by Jane Lebak. Third in a series, this novel covers further ground in Father Jay and his brother Kevin’s contentious relationship, Jay’s impromptu shelter for homeless/neglected boys, and Jay’s ongoing health issues. A shaky truce with his brother and an order from his bishop force Jay into a week’s vacation–and everything starts to fall apart with the gang of “Archangels” he shelters. A fast-paced and enjoyable read. I’m a fan of these characters and eagerly await more Father Jay stories.
tis-the-season‘Tis the Season by Olivia Folmar Ard. In an age of oversharing, a young couple trying to conceive and battling Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) struggles to keep their health issues private. Ironic much? Even more so, considering Lauren spends a lot of time creating and maintaining the perfect social-media persona. And there’s nothing like a holiday trip to see her in-laws to threaten to dismantle all that online perfection. Despite my distaste for “rushing the season” in so many other ways, I’m always up to read a good Christmas story, and this novella did not disappoint.
most-highly-favored-daughterMost Highly Favored Daughter: A Sanctified Suspense by Janice Lane Palko. Set in Pittsburgh against the backdrop of the Super Bowl, this novel tells a harrowing story of human trafficking with an unexpected twist. Heiress Cara Wells is framed with the horrible crime of abusing a young child–but she remembers nothing of what happened that night after falling violently ill. Resolved to untangle the mystery and rescue the young victim of the crime, Cara puts even her marriage and her life on the line. Great local color. (Review copy received from author)
what-lightWhat Light by Jay Asher. Sierra spends 11 months of the year on a Christmas tree farm. The rest of the year she lives in a trailer at a tree lot, hours away from home. This might be her family’s last year at the tree lot, and she’s determined to make the most of it. She’s also determined to give the cute guy who buys trees for poor families a change, even though plenty of locals warn her that he’s trouble. Great premise, well-told story. Appropriate for high-school students (and it’s not even R-rated!) Reads like a Hallmark Christmas movie, which is not at all a bad thing.
christmas-clubThe Christmas Club by Barbara Hinske. Cute Christmas romance novella; a woman loses an envelope of money–all she has for Christmas gifts. Two kindhearted people replace the money, then separately learn how the people who found the lost cash were impacted by the windfall. A series of near misses for the two who replaced the money keeps the story going. This is a sweet, feel-good Christmas story and a quick read.
grace-crasherThe Grace Crasher by Mara Faro. In love with being in love, Julia obsesses over finding an affordable apartment right near her latest crush, a musician who makes her feel like the only person in his audience. Problem is, the only place her budget can handle comes with strings attached: she has to pretend she’s a born-again Christian. What’s an erstwhile Catholic girl to do? And how will she handle it when her landlady’s son discovers that she’s not the person she pretends to be? I enjoyed the local setting of this novel, and I think I’ve been to the Christian bookstore that figures so prominently in the plot (or one suspiciously like it). A great take on infatuation vs. love, speaking the truth in love, and being true to yourself.
someday-someday-maybeSomeday, Someday, Maybe by Lauren Graham. Cute story of a struggling aspiring actress in NYC whose self-sabotaging behavior makes for a fun read, with a little bit of audience frustration thrown in for good measure. WHY does she have to go for the wrong guy? WHY does she go with THAT agent? My favorite part: the pages ripped straight from Franny’s Filofax, between each chapter. Franny’s roommates are terrific characters and merit stories of their own!
destiny-of-sunshine-ranchThe Destiny of Sunshine Ranch by T.M. Gaouette. This novel peeks into the world of children in foster care, kids who have experienced things no child ever should. Sunshine Ranch is the home of a vulnerable child’s dreams, with loving, faithful couple Martha and David caring for and educating 10 children who are in the foster-care system. Life at the ranch is not without its challenges, especially for 10-year-old Benedict who has had things particularly rough. This heartwarming tale has an unexpected ending.
more-than-a-promiseMore than a Promise by Ruth Logan Herne. Grieving the very public breakup of her marriage, artist Elle returns to her hometown to set up her studio and start over. She’s equally captivated and irritated by the 3 young motherless boys next door, left to run wild while their father runs the family business. When the boys’ grandmother threatens the only home they’d ever known, Elle comes up with a crazy scheme to keep the family together and announces her engagement to their dad. The premise is pretty far-fetched, but this novel is worth reading just for the great portrayals of the children.
when-you-reach-meWhen You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead. This novel for middle-school students follows a city kid who’s on her own after school and must navigate a world that includes the usual middle-school friendship dramas, plus gang violence, homelessness and a series of mysterious notes. There’s a time-travel element as well. Great suspense!
beyond-carouselBeyond the Carousel. Bette Lee Crosby continues her Wyattsville saga with yet another story that reinforces my wish to live in a town just like it. This novel spans three generations of a family whose happy life is shattered by a senseless, unsolved murder. Detective Jack Mahoney, out of love for the granddaughter of the murder victim, stakes his career on solving the crime. Don’t think this is just a mystery, though–it’s a three-generation love story.
(Review based on advance reader copy via Socialbook.) This novel will be released in January 2017.

Nonfiction

fearless-lg-coverFearless by Sonja Corbitt puts fear and anxiety into a different perspective, framing them as spiritual attacks and providing tools with which to vanquish them. In short, Fearless is all about spiritual warfare. A mix of personal testimony, quotes from Scripture and the saints and plenty of wise counsel round out this book, which begs to be read (and reread) slowly and with pen and journal close by. Read my full review. (Review copy received from publisher)

Teresa-21Advent with St. Teresa of Calcutta by Heidi Hess Saxton. Heidi Hess Saxton has collected some of Saint Teresa of Calcutta’s most inspiring words and paired them with prayers, daily Mass readings and calls to action in a newly-published seasonal daily devotional. Advent with Saint Teresa of Calcutta: Daily Meditations offers food for thought and prayer for any reader who is devoted to this fascinating saint. Read my full review. (Review copy received from publisher)

who-does-he-say-you-areWho Does He Say You Are? by Colleen C. Mitchell. Expect to be surprised, challenged and changed. Colleen brings out the qualities in several Gospel women that are in every woman, and directs our spiritual journey as we discover how we can be healed as they were. Throughout the book, she shares her own journey of brokenness, faith, healing and trust. The Questions for Reflection at the end of each chapter aren’t merely journal prompts: they are calls to action. (Review copy received from publisher)

missing-kennedyThe Missing Kennedy by Elizabeth Koehler-Pentacoff. Examining the lives of Rosemary Kennedy and the Franciscan nun who cared for her during most of her adult life, Pentacoff’s book connects a privileged handicapped woman who lived a sequestered life with the very ordinary women who ministered to and visited her. The author grew up around Rosemary Kennedy, who was cared for by Sister Paulus, the author’s aunt. Koehler-Pentacoff, along with her parents, was present for holidays, birthdays and ordinary days with Rosemary Kennedy. This is a chronicle of an era when mental illness was misunderstood, and treatments for mental illness were dramatically different than the treatment available today. The book is not a comprehensive biography of Rosemary Kennedy, but the story of how Ms. Kennedy’s life intersected with that of the author. (I received an advance copy from the publisher for the purposes of this review.)

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

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#OpenBook: August 2016 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading. We went on vacation during August, so I had plenty of time to savor some good novels!

Fiction

pretty-lies-other-storiesPretty Lies and Other Stories by Olivia Folmar Ard. Short stories and poetry, all first-person and nearly all anonymous. Ard’s short fiction is very short indeed–the longest selections are a few pages long, but she wastes no words in telling very detailed slice-of-life tales.

 

anne-green-gables-collectionAnne of Green Gables and Anne of Avonlea by L.M. Montgomery. Not just for middle-schoolers; I found more to like in Marilla this time around. When I was a tween/teen, she was the villain in the novels! Anne is captivating and wise beyond her years. The second book is less compelling than the first, but still worthwhile. I wasn’t motivated to read more in the series, though.

saving-abbySaving Abby by Steena Holmes. Steena Holmes gets you hooked on a character and then turns your expectations and emotions inside-out in this novel about a husband and wife who want nothing more than to become parents. A devastating diagnosis threatens the life of both the unborn baby and the mother-to-be.

everything-we-keepEverything We Keep by Kerry Lonsdale. She should be dressed in a bridal gown instead of attending her fiance’s funeral. Aimee never saw the body, either. So when a psychic approaches her after the service with claims that her fiance is still alive, she HAS to follow up. This is a novel of grief, the power of love, and letting go.

pug-listThe Pug List by Alison Hodgson. Read after I heard part of an author interview on the Jennifer Fulwiler Show (Sirius/XM’s The Catholic Channel.) I just didn’t know what to make of this book sometimes. I’m aware that it was written after the trauma of a house fire (everyone was fine, but the home was a total loss) and the family was at loose ends as a result, but sometimes I felt that the emotion, expressed after the fact, seemed forced and overpowered the story the author was trying to tell.

unexpected-everythingThe Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson. YA novel about a politician’s daughter who loses an internship after her father’s political fall from grace. A dog-walking job introduces her to a young novelist and forces her to consider what really matters in terms of relationships and honesty. Good story of resilience and friendship.

life-listThe Life List by Lori Nelson Spielman. Brett’s mother is a high-powered cosmetics executive. After her death, 34-year-old Brett receives her life-goal list–written when she was only 14. Brett has 12 months to achieve those goals in order to receive her inheritance. An enjoyable, if predictable, read. There really weren’t too many plot twists, but I did like the characters and wanted to see how it all turned out.

recipe-by-candace-calvertThe Recipe by Candace Calvert. Short, sweet romance about a young woman seeking her way in the world, aided by a little blackmail, a stroke victim, an organic farmstand and a well-intentioned grandson. Good story with great characters!

Nonfiction

WLA-PWorks of Love are Works of Peace by Michael Collopy. While biographies are a wonderful way to get to know a person, they don’t always tell the whole story. Photographer Michael Collopy proves that images can say much more than words in this newly-reissued photobook from Ignatius Press, which documents the work of St. Teresa of Calcutta and her Missionaries of Charity. Originally published in 1996, the large-format book has been updated with an appendix containing the contents of the Missionaries of Charity daily prayer book as well as a most personal and profound letter on the interior life written by Mother Teresa during Holy Week of 1993 and addressed to her entire order. Described by the publisher as an “illustrated prayer book,” this book is an extended photo essay that brings home the radical life of service modeled by Blessed Mother Teresa and the Sisters. Full review here.

marys-wayMary’s Way: The Power of Entrusting Your Child to God by Judy Klein. This is both a testament to perseverance and a guide to surrender. Judy Klein shares her own heartbreaks as a mother, tracing her journey as a parent and a Catholic. But this book is more than a memoir: it’s a call to a very specific kind of prayer by mothers for their own children. Full review here.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

I received review copies of both nonfiction books from the publishers in exchange for my honest review. I purchased all the fiction books myself or borrowed them from the library. Opinions expressed here are mine alone.

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

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An Open Book: June 2016 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

sunflowers in a hurricaneSunflowers in a Hurricane by Anne FayeThis is the story of a life-changing summer as seen through the eyes of three characters: teenage Ruth, her single mom Cheryl and their elderly neighbor George. It’s hard to get three voices to ring strong and true in a novel, but Anne Faye has achieved this in Sunflowers in a Hurricane. The characters will draw the reader in; their transformations throughout the story are true-to-life without being predictable. My full review of the novel is here.

unclaimed coverUnclaimed by Erin McCole Cupp. This dystopian spin on Jane Eyre transports the reader into a world that, disturbingly, seems just around the corner. I was captivated by Jane E’s boldness and resilience as she navigated the challenging circumstances of living with a genetic defect in a designer-gene world. Erin McCole Cupp’s novel is a blend of three genres I rarely read (19th-century novel, dystopian fiction and fanfic) and it’s definitely a combo that works.

priest and the peachesThe Priest and the Peaches  by Larry Peterson introduces the Peach family at a crisis point in their lives: the sudden death of their father. Their mother had died a few years prior, and these kids ranging in age from 18 to 7 are completely on their own as 1966 begins. Now the two oldest, Teddy and Joanie, have to figure out how to get food on the table and pay the rent for their Bronx apartment. They’re reminded, in the midst of hardship, just how much their father lived by his favorite catchphrase, “L-Y-N” (love your neighbor), what it costs to do this, and how living this way will change their lives.

demons of abadonThe Demons of Abadon by Larry Peterson follows the family as summer approaches and their parish priest arranges for the two youngest boys, Joey and Beeker, to stay with friends of his in northwestern New Jersey. This is an unsettling tale of a spiritual battle; the Abadon forest is infested by “darkened” souls who don’t want 7-year-old Joey, innocent and very in tune with God, anywhere near them. Strange and scary things begin to happen, and you’ll keep turning pages to find out what’s behind the disturbing events in Abadon and how the Peach kids and the Winters family who took them in will weather this spiritual storm.

song of silenceSong of Silence by Cynthia Ruchti opens with a music teacher losing her lifelong passion as the arts program at her school is completely eliminated. Her grief is complicated by her husband’s eagerness to stick close–too close–by her side during every moment of the day. Adrift, she seeks to find a way to bring the song back to her heart, only to discover the depths of real grief after a boating accident. I didn’t want this novel to end, and I will look for more by this author.

not so good in a room(Not So) Good in a Room by Dakota Madison. Cyrano de Bergerac meets the casting couch in this light romance. Nellie is a screenwriter who can script a terrific action movie but freezes up when it’s time to pitch. An unmotivated screenwriter offers the services of his actor to help sell Nellie’s scripts–but then the work won’t be known as hers, and crushes complicate matters.

just a matter of timeJust a Matter of Time by Charity Tahmaseb is a YA paranormal romance (definitely not my usual genre) but I was intrigued by the premise: a student figures out how to “steal time” from other students, decreasing their ability to focus on their work. I wish this were a full-length novel.

 

Full Cycle coverFull Cycle by Christopher Blunt. Perfect for readers age 10 and up–and their parents, this father-son story follows sixth-grader Alex Peterson, a wanna-be athlete hindered from achieving this goal by an injury he received in an accident at his own birthday party. This is a story of perseverance, of teamwork and of looking beyond a disability to draw upon talents yet untapped. It would make a great movie. My full review is here.

Dying for Revenge Final FrontDying for Revenge by Dr. Barbara Golden is heavy on the suspense with none of the blood and guts. In other words, it kept me turning pages (and pages and pages), but I was still able to sleep without nightmares and I didn’t lose my appetite. The main character is a pathologist/investigator haunted by her own grief and desire for revenge. There’s much more than a mystery in this thriller; it’s the story of a soul in torment. My full review is here.

Nonfiction

find a real friend in JesusFind a Real Friend in Jesus by Gary Zimak. The author describes “Ten Amazingly Easy Steps” to encounter Jesus in your own life. While the steps may be “easy,” they do require effort on your part–but that effort will bear great spiritual fruit! Find a Real Friend in Jesus is easy to read and an excellent book to take to prayer as you seek to draw closer to the Lord. My full review of this book is here.

creedThe Creed by Scott Hahn. In this very readable book, Hahn traces the history of, first, the Jewish covenants and then the Christian creeds. The reader will learn that every single word of the Creed is important. Every word is there for a reason. The Creed proclaims both mystery (God becomes man) and history (Jesus was born, walked the earth, died and rose.) My full review is here.

my life as lauraMy Life as Laura: How I Searched for Laura Ingalls Wilder and Found Myself by Kelly Kathleen Ferguson. Another one of those “get a book deal to do something for a year and write about it” books that I can’t seem to resist reading–plus it’s about Laura Ingalls Wilder. Like me, the author found that the TV version of Laura’s story left her cold. She spent a year wearing an oddly-colored prairie dress and retracing Laura’s steps throughout the Midwest. It was a strange memoir, in a can’t-look-away-from-this-train-wreck sort of way.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!)

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

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#OpenBook: April 2016 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading:

Fiction

A Cup of Dust: A Novel of the Dust Bowl by Susie Finkbeiner. This harrowing novel graphically depicts the hardships faced in Western Oklahoma during the Dust Bowl years. Ten-year-old Pearl sees the poverty around her and learns about mercy through the way her parents share what they have with those who have nothing. Unfortunately, some of these works of mercy lead to opening the door to the revelation of a family secret and putting the entire family at risk.

Just Claire by Jean Ann Williams. This coming-of-age novel for tweens and up focuses on Claire, the oldest in a large family that has just relocated due to a job change for their father. They live in a cabin in a lumber camp in a Western state. The move brings on labor for Claire’s mother, and Claire is left caring for several siblings when her mother experiences birth complications and postpartum depression. 13-year-old Claire tries to fit in at school but is caught between the Mean Girls and Belinda, a true friend who is bullied by her peers and whose family situation is worse than Claire’s.

Frozen Footprints by Therese Heckencamp. 18-year-old twins, growing up under the thumb of their wealthy but tyrannical grandfather, find different ways to deal with the situation. Max is all set to run away when he is kidnapped by a disgruntled former employee of his grandfather. Charlene, closely bonded with her brother, seeks to save him when her grandfather refuses and finds herself a hostage as well. Then the kidnapper’s brother enters the picture. This novel will keep readers guessing the whole time.

after the thawAfter the Thaw by Therese Heckencamp. This fast-paced suspense novel picks up a few years after Frozen Footprints leaves off, continuing main character Charlene’s story. She can’t break off the link with her kidnapper’s brother who was forced to torture her and Max but who wanted to help them escape. The villains were unspeakably frightening.

admissionsThe Admissions by Meg Mitchell Moore. A novel of a Bay Area family whose life is coming apart at the seams. Stressors include a high-school senior trying to get into Harvard, a second-grader who can’t read, a realtor mom whose high-priced deals start falling through, and a mysterious intern at the dad’s office. From what I’ve read so far, I think a better title might be “By Hook or By Crook” as it seems like most of the members of this family are bent on getting what they want by any means necessary. I’m reading this right now and I have to say, I find it disturbing. I’m actually puzzled about why my mother insisted that I get my hands on this book. Honestly, that’s why I haven’t abandoned it yet–I’m trying to figure out why she recommended it to me!

Nonfiction

girlfriends and other saintsGirlfriends and Other Saints by Teresa Tomeo. Teresa Tomeo’s spiritual writing has a style all its own; she’s funny without being shallow and she doesn’t hesitate to tell it like it is. Best of all, you don’t need a degree in Sacred Theology to benefit from her books. My full review is here.

talking to GodTalking to God by Julie Cragon. Get your hands on this new prayer book by Julie Cragon, but don’t read it all the way through. That’s not what Talking to God is for. It’s a small book (on purpose), just right to slide into your handbag for easy reference in prayer emergencies. My full review is here.

hope unfoldingHope Unfolding by Becky Thompson. Part spiritual memoir, part devotional, Hope Unfolding explores how moms can learn to lean on God: we shouldn’t be trying to do it all by ourselves. Each chapter of the book concludes with journal prompts, a prayer and a note of hope. Becky Thompson writes from the perspective of a mom with very young children. Though I haven’t fit into that category for quite a while, this book still spoke to me. My full review is here.

divine mercy for momsDivine Mercy for Moms by Michele Faehnle and Emily Jaminet. For moms with children of any age, this book packs a strong spiritual punch. It’s loaded with advice on living the corporal and spiritual works of mercy in family life and comes complete with an excellent resource list, including a tutorial on the Divine Mercy Chaplet.

four keys to everlasting loveThe Four Keys to Everlasting Love by Dr. Manuel and Karee Santos. This husband-and-wife writing team has put together a book on how to maintain a healthy sacramental marriage in a society that doesn’t support such a relationship. This comprehensive book is an excellent resource for marriage prep, but it’s not just for engaged couples or even newlyweds. Married couples in all stages of life can benefit from the sage advice they’ll find here. While couples whose relationships are on rocky ground will find help and hope in this book, it also contains plenty of encouragement for the growth and maintenance of healthy married relationships.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently (even the duds!.

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read! You’ll find it at Carolyn Astfalk’s A Scribbler’s Heart and at CatholicMom.com!

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#OpenBook: March 2016 Reads

The first Wednesday of each month, Carolyn Astfalk hosts #OpenBook, where bloggers link posts about books they’ve read recently. Here’s a taste of what I’ve been reading. (Note: I read a few duds this month, so I’ve limited my list to the good stuff.)

Fiction

pennies from burger heavenPennies from Burger Heaven by Marcy McKay. A beautifully-written novel about a homeless child of a drug-addicted mother, and the child’s attempts at survival in threatening situations when her mother unexpectedly disappears. This novel will stay with you for a long time.

 

 

blue eyed dollBlue-Eyed Doll by Deanna Klingel. This fascinating historical novel, appropriate for middle-school students and up, transports the reader to 1920s California, where students collected dolls to exchange for dolls from students in Japan, and follows the collectible dolls into World War II and its aftermath. Don’t miss the gutsy main character–she’s terrific.

 

behaveBehave by Andromeda Romano-Lax. Behave is a disturbing novel centering on one of the pioneers of behavioral research, John Watson, and his second wife. It’s easy to consider this a novel, rather than a novelized biography.
I found the “inside baseball” on what went on in those psychology behavior labs scary, and would have liked to have seen more on the outcome of the lives of any child who spent part of his infancy in the labs.

 

Nonfiction

badass book of saintsMy Badass Book of Saints by Maria Morera Johnson. Packed full of stories of saints and saints-to-be whose courage belies the typical holy-card image, this book inspires women who don’t shy away from a challenge. Maria Johnson has collected a wonderful assortment of examples of contemporary women and saints from a wide variety of time periods and organized them according to qualities they had in common, such as challenging the status quo, showing perseverance, or living and dying to uphold human dignity. Highly recommended–this would be a great Confirmation gift!

spring meditations Liguori PubSpring Meditations by John Bartunek, LC. I reviewed this book here.

Links to books in this post are Amazon affiliate links. Your purchases made through these links support Franciscanmom.com. Thank you!

Follow my Goodreads reviews for the full list of what I’ve read recently.

Visit today’s #OpenBook post to join the linkup or just get some great ideas about what to read!

Courtesy of Carolyn Astfalk via A Scribber's Heart Blog.
Courtesy of Carolyn Astfalk via A Scribber’s Heart Blog.