On Barb’s Bookshelf: Sunflowers in a Hurricane

Sunflowers in a Hurricane is the story of a life-changing summer as seen through the eyes of three characters: teenage Ruth, her single mom Cheryl and their elderly neighbor George.

Returning to her hometown after her mother’s death, Cheryl is forced to face the memories she’d tried so hard to bury. Her daughter doesn’t understand why her mom strictly forbids her to talk to boys; all she wants is a friend, and the shy paperboy is the perfect candidate. Cheryl is equally uncomfortable with Ruth’s friendship with George next door, a man haunted by the loss of his wife during childbirth and his decision to give their daughter to his sister-in-law to raise.

While George becomes the grandfather Ruth never had (and Ruth the granddaughter George never had), Cheryl grieves as she has done for thirteen years: by sulking and isolating herself. She grieves the loss of her own teenage freedom to an early pregnancy–and though she won’t admit it, she grieves her mother’s loss as well.

sunflowers in a hurricane

It’s hard to get three voices to ring strong and true in a novel, but Anne Faye has achieved this in Sunflowers in a Hurricane. The characters will draw the reader in; their transformations throughout the story are true-to-life without being predictable.

You’ll find the first few chapters of this book at Anne Faye’s website.

This post contains Amazon affiliate links; your purchase through these links helps support this blog. Thank you! I was given a free review copy of this book, but no other compensation. Opinions expressed here are mine alone.

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One thought on “On Barb’s Bookshelf: Sunflowers in a Hurricane

  1. […] Sunflowers in a Hurricane by Anne Faye. This is the story of a life-changing summer as seen through the eyes of three characters: teenage Ruth, her single mom Cheryl and their elderly neighbor George. It’s hard to get three voices to ring strong and true in a novel, but Anne Faye has achieved this in Sunflowers in a Hurricane. The characters will draw the reader in; their transformations throughout the story are true-to-life without being predictable. My full review of the novel is here. […]

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